Understanding the relationship between mental illness and ethnicity

Chapter 2 Culture Counts: The Influence of Culture and Society on Mental Health Introduction To better understand what happens inside the clinical setting, this chapter looks outside. It reveals the diverse effects of culture and society on mental health, mental illness, and mental health services.

Understanding the relationship between mental illness and ethnicity

Introduction America draws strength from its cultural diversity. The contributions of racial and ethnic minorities have suffused all areas of contemporary life. Diversity has made our Nation a more vibrant and open society, ablaze in ideas, perspectives, and innovations.

But the full potential of our diverse, multicultural society cannot be realized until all Americans, including racial and ethnic minorities, gain access to quality health care that meets their needs. This Supplement to Mental Health: A Report of the Surgeon General U. Department of Health and Human Services [DHHS], documents the existence of striking disparities for minorities in mental health services and the underlying knowledge base.

Racial and ethnic minorities have less access to mental health services than do whites. When they receive care, it is more likely to be poor in quality. These disparities have powerful significance for minority groups and for society as a whole.

Introduction

A major finding of this Supplement is that racial and ethnic minorities bear a greater burden from unmet mental health needs and thus suffer a greater loss to their overall health and productivity.

This conclusion draws on prominent international and national findings. One is that mental disorders are highly disabling across all populations. Another important finding comes from the largest disability study ever conducted in the United States It found that one-third of disabled 3 adults ages living in the community 4 reported having a mental disorder contributing to their disability Druss et al.

While neither of these studies addressed the disability burden for minorities relative to whites, key findings from this Supplement do: Most minority groups are less likely than whites to use services, and they receive poorer quality mental health care, despite having similar community rates of mental disorders.

Similar prevalence, combined with lower utilization and poorer quality of care, means that minority communities have a higher proportion of individuals with unmet mental health needs.

Understanding the relationship between mental illness and ethnicity

These subpopulations have higher rates of mental disorders than do people living in the community Koegel et al. Taken together, the evidence suggests that the disability burden from unmet mental health needs is disproportionately high for racial and ethnic minorities relative to whites.

The greater disability burden to minorities is of grave concern to public health, and it has very real consequences. Ethnic and racial minorities do not yet completely share in the hope afforded by remarkable scientific advances in understanding and treating mental disorders.

Because of preventable disparities in mental health services, a disproportionate number of minorities are not fully benefiting from, or contributing to, the opportunities and prosperity of our society. More is known about the existence of disparities in mental health services - and their significance - than the reasons behind them.

The most likely explanations, identified in Mental Health: A Report of the Surgeon General, are expanded upon throughout this Supplement. They trace to a mix of barriers deterring minorities from seeking treatment or operating to reduce its quality once they reach treatment. The foremost barriers include the cost of care, societal stigma, and the fragmented organization of services.

The cumulative weight and interplay of all of these barriers, not any single one alone, is likely responsible for mental health disparities.Poverty and mental health framework for understanding the relationship between poverty and mental health, which draws together: a life course analysis; a discussion of to addressing mental health and poverty in later life.

Primary care screening for mental health problems (particularly. Chapter 2 lays the foundations for understanding the relationships between culture, mental health, mental illness, and mental health services. Chapters 3 through 6 provide information about each racial and ethnic minority group.

Population Health: Behavioral and Social Science Insights Understanding the Relationship Between Education and Health. A Review of the Evidence and an Examination of Community Perspectives. Previous Page. Table of Contents. Population Health: Behavioral and Social Science Insights.

Conclusion. Foreword. Introduction. . Mental health and mental illness require the broad focus of a public health approach. Mental disorders are disabling conditions. Mental health and mental illness are points on a continuum.

Mind and body are inseparable. Stigma is a major obstacle preventing people from getting help. Messages from the Surgeon General Mental health is fundamental to health. This blog will explore the relationship between culture and mental health.

Grounded in contemporary research, current events and personal experiences, I will write about how our perceptions of. Population Health: Behavioral and Social Science Insights Understanding the Relationship Between Education and Health. A Review of the Evidence and an Examination of Community Perspectives.

Previous Page. Table of Contents. Population Health: Behavioral and Social Science Insights. Conclusion. Foreword. Introduction. Preface. Section I.

Understanding Associations between Race, Socioeconomic Status and Health: Patterns and Prospects