The importance of the issue of violence against women

Article 1 For the purposes of this Declaration, the term "violence against women" means any act of gender-based violence that results in, or is likely to result in, physical, sexual or psychological harm or suffering to women, including threats of such acts, coercion or arbitrary deprivation of liberty, whether occurring in public or in private life. Article 2 Violence against women shall be understood to encompass, but not be limited to, the following:

The importance of the issue of violence against women

Thereafter, reports should be submitted at least every four years after the first report was due and should include obstacles encountered in implementing the Convention fully and the measures adopted to overcome such obstacles.

Take appropriate steps to ensure the dissemination of the Convention, the reports of the States parties under article 18 and the reports of the Committee in the language of the States concerned; 3.

My Story: End Violence against Women & Girls

Seek the assistance of the Secretary-General and the Department of Public Information in providing translations of the Convention and the reports of the Committee; 4. Include in their initial and periodic reports the action taken in respect of this recommendation.

That they continue to support proposals for strengthening the co-ordination between the Centre for Human Rights at Geneva and the Centre for Social Development and Humanitarian Affairs at Vienna, in relation to the servicing of the Committee; 2.

That they support proposals that the Committee meet in New York and Vienna; 3. That they take all necessary and appropriate steps to ensure that adequate resources and services are available to the Committee to assist it in its functions under the Convention and in particular that full-time staff are available to help the Committee to prepare for its sessions and during its session; 4.

That they ensure that supplementary reports and materials are submitted to the Secretariat in due time to be translated into the official languages of the United Nations in time for distribution and consideration by the Committee.

Back to top General Recommendation No. Undertaking programmes including conferences and seminars to publicize the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women in the main languages of and providing information on the Convention in their respective countries; 2.

Inviting their national women's organizations to cooperate in the publicity campaigns regarding the Convention and its implementation and encouraging non-governmental organizations at the national, regional and international levels to publicize the Convention and its implementation; 3.

The importance of the issue of violence against women

Encouraging action to ensure the full implementation of the principles of the Convention, and in particular article 8, which relates to the participation of women at all levels of activity of the United Nations and the United Nations system; 4. Equality, Development and Peace, held at Nairobi in The legislation in force to protect women against the incidence of all kinds of violence in everyday life including sexual violence, abuses in the family, sexual harassment at the work place etc.

"Forgotten Dead packs a mighty wallop into a small package. Combining extensive research with crafeully crafted generalizations, the book reveals the origins, extent, importance, and legacy of mob violence against Mexicans." Dowry-related violence is a serious problem that affects the lives of women and girls. Dowry includes gifts, money, goods or property given from the bride’s family to the groom or in-laws before, during or anytime after the marriage. Apr 04,  · When speaking about “violence against women and girls,” it is important to remember that this issue involves both men and women and requires a holistic approach. The overwhelming majority of violence is perpetrated by men, and addressing male perpetration is a critical part of addressing VAWG.

Other measures adopted to eradicate this violence; 3. The existence of support services for women who are the victims of aggression or abuses; 4.

Statistical data on the incidence of violence of all kinds against women and on women who are the victims of violence.

General recommendations made by the Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women

They should consider the study, development and adoption of job evaluation systems based on gender-neutral criteria that would facilitate the comparison of the value of those jobs of a different nature, in which women presently predominate, with those jobs in which men presently predominate, and they should include the results achieved in their reports to the Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women; 3.

They should support, as far as practicable, the creation of implementation machinery and encourage the efforts of the parties to collective agreements, where they apply, to ensure the application of the principle of equal remuneration for work of equal value.

Such measures could include: Such strategies could include the special responsibility of health personnel, including traditional birth attendants, to explain the harmful effects of female circumcision; c Invite assistance, information and advice from the appropriate organizations of the United Nations system to support and assist efforts being deployed to eliminate harmful traditional practices; d Include in their reports to the Committee under articles 10 and 12 of the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women information about measures taken to eliminate female circumcision.

Gender-based violence is a form of discrimination that seriously inhibits women's ability to enjoy rights and freedoms on a basis of equality with men. Inthe Committee recommended that States should include in their reports information on violence and on measures introduced to deal with it General recommendation 12, eighth session.

At its tenth session init was decided to allocate part of the eleventh session to a discussion and study on article 6 and other articles of the Convention relating to violence towards women and the sexual harassment and exploitation of women.

The Committee concluded that not all the reports of States parties adequately reflected the close connection between discrimination against women, gender-based violence, and violations of human rights and fundamental freedoms. The full implementation of the Convention required States to take positive measures to eliminate all forms of violence against women.

The Committee suggested to States parties that in reviewing their laws and policies, and in reporting under the Convention, they should have regard to the following comments of the Committee concerning gender-based violence.

The Convention in article 1 defines discrimination against women. The definition of discrimination includes gender-based violence, that is, violence that is directed against a woman because she is a woman or that affects women disproportionately.

It includes acts that inflict physical, mental or sexual harm or suffering, threats of such acts, coercion and other deprivations of liberty. Gender-based violence may breach specific provisions of the Convention, regardless of whether those provisions expressly mention violence.

Gender-based violence, which impairs or nullifies the enjoyment by women of human rights and fundamental freedoms under general international law or under human rights conventions, is discrimination within the meaning of article 1 of the Convention.

These rights and freedoms include: The Convention applies to violence perpetrated by public authorities. Such acts of violence may breach that State's obligations under general international human rights law and under other conventions, in addition to breaching this Convention.Physical or sexual violence is a public health problem that affects more than one third of all women globally, according to a new report released by WHO in partnership with the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine and the South African Medical Research Council.

On this year’s International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women (25 November), we honour and amplify the voices of survivors and grassroots activists.

Under the UN theme, “Orange the World: #HearMeToo,” UN Women Executive Director Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka issues a call to listen. Domestic violence is one element in the overall issue of violence against women, which includes, among other crimes, murder, rape, sexual assault, trafficking, sexual stalking and sexual harassment.

Domestic violence often occurs over a period of time. The term "intimate partner violence" (IPV) is often used synonymously with domestic abuse/domestic violence.

Family violence is a broader definition, often used to include child abuse, elder abuse, and other violent acts between family members. 85 percent of domestic violence victims are women.1 Although violence is manifested differently, women of all ages, nationalities, economic classes, and ethnic groups are affected.

2 For more on the scope of the issue, see page 2. Mar 01,  · The Violence Against Women Act. The United States passed the federal law The Violence Against Women Act of (Title IV, sec. of the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of ) on September 13,

A/RES/48/ Declaration on the Elimination of Violence against Women